National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women

990 Spring Garden Street, Suite 703

Philadelphia, PA 19123

215/763-1144
800/903-0111 x3

We accept collect calls from incarcerated
victims of battering.

© 2019 by the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women

Annotated Links

Reentry Resources: When Victims of Battering Return to the Community after Jail or Prison

The National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women has compiled a number of resource listings about survivors as they reenter their communities after being incarcerated in prison and/or jail.

 

While the listings are primarily for practitioners and advocates working with charged, incarcerated and/or reentering victims of battering, some of the included resources could also be useful for charged, incarcerated and/or reentering victims themselves and/or for members of their families.

 

Since we know that effective reentry planning begins at arrest, some of the listings also include resources that could be helpful to practitioners working with incarcerated women in various stages of their reentry process.

 

While resources that address the specific needs of reentering women are becoming increasingly available on the internet, almost none are for or about reentering victims of intimate partner violence. Where information exists online that is specific to the reentry experiences of battered women, we included it in the listing. And, while even more resources are available on the internet about people returning to their communities after incarceration, the resources we included in most of the listings tend to be focused on women.

 

The resource listings in the series are:

 

GENERAL INFORMATION AND NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

When Victims of Battering Return to the Community after Jail or Prison: General Information & National Organizations — click here for resource

 

COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES OF CRIMINAL RECORDS

Understanding and Mitigating the Direct and Collateral Consequences of
Criminal Records — click here for resource

 

CURRICULA

Working with Incarcerated and Reentering Women: Curricula and Resources for Individual and Group Work — click here for resource

 

EVIDENCE–BASED PRACTICES

Evidence-Based Reentry Practices for Justice-Involved Women — click here for resource

EMPLOYMENT

Employment Issues and Efforts for Reentering People — click here for resource

FAMILY REUNIFICATION

Children and Family Reunification for Reentering People — click here for resource

FILM

Documentary Films About Incarceration and Reentry — click here for resource

HEALTH & HEALTH INSURANCE

Incarcerated Women’s Health & Health Insurance for Reentering People — click here for resource

 

HIV/AIDS

Women Living with HIV/AIDS and Histories of Criminal Justice Contact — click here for resource

 

JUVENILE JUSTICE

Reentering Youth and/or Youth with Juvenile Justice Involvement — click here for resource

 

LGBTQ PEOPLE

Working with Arrested, Charged, Incarcerated, and Returning LGBTQ People  — click here for resource

 

MENTAL HEALTH, SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND CO-OCCURING DISORDERS

Justice-Involved Victims of Battering with Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and
Co-Occurring Disorders — click here for resource

 

PROBATION AND PAROLE

When Victims of Battering are on Probation or Parole — click here for resource

 

SEXUAL ABUSE AND PREA

Selected Internet Resources Focusing on Women/Victims of Battering Charged
With Crimes Addressing Sexual Abuse Inside Jails and Prisons: PREA and Other Responses — click here for resource

 

A note about language: Labels can often stigmatize people and create barriers between those using the labels and those being labeled. Some of the resources included in this listing use the term “women offender” for women returning home from jails and prisons. It is not a term we use at the National Clearinghouse. Many incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women have objected to that term. We believe it is critical that individuals not be defined by their crime/alleged crime. Instead, we use terms such as “reentering woman,” “person returning from jail/prison,” or “formerly incarcerated woman.” In our listings we changed words like “offender” or “inmate” when they did not appear in the title and when it did not affect the integrity of the document being described.

 

This project was supported by Grant No. 2011-TA-AX-K129 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women.

 

Last updated: November 2019